Culture February 7, 2018

How Baseball Mirrors America

There is something about sitting up there in the bleachers or down on the hot corner at third base that captures the spirit, mood and geography of the country.

There was a time when baseball was considered America’s favorite pastime. Then came steroids, night games, cheaters, and betters—further reflecting American culture as it moved from easier-paced pastoral life to a frenzied city jungle. The game hasn’t changed much and the traditions linger from stick ball to softball, from Little League to The Show. Above all, the poetry remains and Casey will get to play another day.

Consider how baseball reflects American culture:

  1. It’s the only team sport where the person scores not the object
  2. You come home to score. You don’t “invade” the opponent’s turf
  3. Every infield has the same dimensions—there is no variation
  4. All the outfields are different in terms of distance from home plate and type of wall
  5. Everyone places offense and defense
  6. Defense is a team effort. Offense, for the most part, is an individual effort
  7. Anyone can make the difference in the outcome at any point in the game
  8. The game is not played against the clock: it can go on “forever”
  9. _____________________________________

This is just a start. Your turn at bat. You can fill in the blank and add extra “innings”

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Our Greek Chorus
Opinions of The Vigilant
The Greek chorus was an integral part of ancient Greek theatre, a group of three or four performers who looked alike and spoke all at the same time. Their part was to comment on what was being said and help the audience know what the characters in the play were thinking. The chorus usually sang, or spoke. We honor that tradition here
John Fogerty
"Put me in coach, I’m ready to play"
Our Greek Chorus
Opinions of The Vigilant
The Greek chorus was an integral part of ancient Greek theatre, a group of three or four performers who looked alike and spoke all at the same time. Their part was to comment on what was being said and help the audience know what the characters in the play were thinking. The chorus usually sang, or spoke. We honor that tradition here
Baseball, like other parts of American
culture, can get out of control, especially
when we think we are right, but the ref
called him out.

Billy Martin
Write from the Heart
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